Behavior Modification Smokeless Cigarette

In today’s fast paced society everything is easy and fast. Just 25 minutes a day and you will have the body of your dreams, sign up for a dating service and you will find your soul mate in no time at all, but putting down that pack of cigarette is a different story. A simple Google search of “quitting smoking is hard” yields 2,450,000 results. At the top of the results page is a smoke free advocacy group, a great source for anyone thinking about quitting smoking. However, the site suggests to the readers that its hard to quit, even proposing that one should avoid friends that smoke. Does it really have to be that extreme? The answer is no.

For years the most popular forms of quit smoking products have been nicotine replacement therapies, produced by multinational pharmaceutical companies such as GlaxoSmithKline. The products themselves come in the form of patches and gum and have been widely used as a conventional method for people to quit smoking. Even if you are not a smoker you probably saw their advertisements on television or online.

Nicotine replacement therapy (NTR) is exactly what the name implies, it is a therapy designed to for smokers to use the patches or gum instead of obtaining nicotine through the use of cigarettes. This form of therapy is used by many people, but how effective is it? One of many studies show that NRT leaves much to be derired for:

Overall, nicotine replacement therapy could enable about 15% of smokers who seek help in stopping smoking to give up the habit.

The question is how to reach the other 85%. The answer is simple, a behavior modification product that feels and looks like a real cigarette, but does not contain any harmful chemicals such as nicotine, tobacco, tar, or vapor. Since they do not contain these harmful chemicals they can also be used with conventional nicotine replacement therapies. Many other common smoking cessation products focus on the physical addiction to nicotine, not the more powerful psychological addiction to the “act of smoking.” The only way to confront the attraction a smoker feels to an authentic cigarette is to replicate that product with a cigarette substitute, a fake-smokeless cigarette.